Posts Tagged ‘The Government of Anguilla’

Anguilla Takes Another Step Toward Renewables

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Nearly 100 Anguillan stakeholders gather at a Government of Anguilla Workshop to hear initial recommendations for the integration of Renewables into Anguilla’s Energy profile.

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CaribPR Wire, The Valley, Anguilla, Fri. April 27, 2012: On Tuesday 24th of April, The Government of Anguilla’s Ministry of Infrastructure, Communications, Utilities and Housing (MICUH) hosted the Anguilla Renewable Energy Integration Project (AREIP) Stakeholder Workshop at Paradise Cove Resort, Anguilla. Close to 100 local stakeholders gathered to listen and comment on the presentation of the initial report from the Project Consultants, Castalia Strategic Advisors. The AREIP is being funded by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) – a UK based development funding agency that aims to help decision-makers in developing countries design and deliver climate compatible development.

The specific purpose of the project is to support Anguilla’s efforts to implement key elements of its National Energy Policy and Climate Change Policies by amending current electricity legislation to provide a clear framework for the integration of both customer-sited and utility-scale renewable energy into the national electricity grid.

At the welcoming ceremony the Chief Minister, The Hon Hubert Hughes stressed how important this Project is to the Government and people of Anguilla. The Minister with responsibility for Energy, the Hon Evan Gumbs went on to tell the audience that the Integration of Renewables was his Ministry’s priority – in order that there will be a cheaper and more sustainable Energy Supply for Anguillans. Minister Gumbs thanked the stakeholders for coming and stated positively that “relief is not here yet, but it’s coming”.
The Presentation was led by Mr. Gianmarco Servetti, Castalia Principal and Project Director, with the assistance of two colleagues, Project Manager Ms. Laura Berman and Legal Consultant Ms. Barbara Vargas. The key assessments and recommendations can be briefly summarized as follows:

• Anguilla has economically viable renewable energy resources that can be used now.
• Anguilla’s viable renewable energy resources include solar hot water heating, solar electricity production on both a large, utility scale and a small home and business scale, and utility scale wind energy. There’s also a possibility that Anguilla could produce some limited utility scale waste to energy.
• All new buildings that require hot water should be mandated to use solar hot water heating.
• Anguilla’s Electricity Act should be amended to allow those people generating electricity at their home or business with solar or wind – referred to as Distributed Generators, to sell any excess power they produce back to the national grid under a contract agreement with the electric utility.
• Utility rules should be put in place to govern Distributed Generators’ eligibility for interconnection, technical compliance standards, contract term and payment rates under the agreement.
The three consultants then facilitated lively and informative breakout sessions on: Assessing the Potential and Viability of Renewable Energy Projects; Land Use, the Environment and Development of Renewable Energy Projects and Selling Electricity Generated by Renewable Energy Technologies.

The wrap up session saw many local stakeholders taking the floor and sharing their hopes and concerns – including Mr. Sutcliffe Hodge, who talked about the sustainability of Anguilla’s National Utility, ANGLEC, and its need to be ambitious and embrace renewables; Mr. David Gumbs, the CFO of ANGLEC who gave many examples of ANGLEC’S commitment to do so; and Mr. David Carty, Chairman of the Anguilla National Energy Committee (ANEC) who reminded the audience of the ‘big picture’ and posed that mitigating climate change is key, and the integration of renewables and the sustainable development of Anguilla can serve as a role model for other developing nations, and as such should attract international funding and exposure for Anguilla.

Mr. Servetti said, “It was a successful workshop. There proved to be lots of interest and buy-in for the regulatory changes in the short term and also support for broader reforms long term.” When asked if he thought the audience was engaged he went on to say, “More than normal – it seems everyone feels that they have a primary role. It was a very lively and engaging discussion – and productive too.” When asked when the recommendations could be acted on he added “some can be implemented immediately …some can happen now.”

Mr. Crefton A. Niles, Director of Public Utilities/Telecommunications Officer, Government of Anguilla, who is managing the project, said, “… an excellent workshop – lots of information was exchanged in both directions. Participants questioned the presenters and vice-versa. We all came together for the benefit of the country as a whole. I look forward to the final report from the consultants and thank CDKN & DFID for their overall sponsorship of the project.”

The Project Manager for CDKN, Ms. Patricia Leon, summed it up “It was inspiring to see the interest of different stakeholders in Renewable Energy and I look forward to seeing the recommendations being analyzed by the Government of Anguilla and implemented in projects that benefit the people of Anguilla.”

The Anguilla Renewable Energy Office (AREO) was instrumental in securing funds for the project from CDKN and continues to play a key role – working alongside the Government of Anguilla to raise awareness of and communicate the milestones and successes of the AREIP by regular communications with stakeholders.

For more information please contact Mr. Crefton Niles, Government Project Manager, at the Ministry of Energy at email crefton.niles@gov.ai, or at Tel: 264-497-2651 (W), or 264-476-0056 (M); or Beth Barry, Renewable Energy Coordinator at Tel: 1-264-235-8292 or email: beth@anguillareo.org
PLEASE NOTE: This document is an output from a project funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) for the benefit of developing countries. However, the views expressed and information contained in it are not necessarily those of or endorsed by DFID or the members of the Climate and Development Knowledge Network, which can accept no responsibility or liability for such views, completeness or accuracy of the information or for any reliance placed on them.

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